The Wonderment of the Internet

Once upon a time…

I had a really bomb-ass website. My book was completely online, set up so one can flip through the pages and read the material, click on individual stories from the Table of Contents, plus a handful of blog posts and stuff that might keep someone interested beyond a few minutes.

Motherfucking hackers. Yup.

Tore the flagship website down and two others, including my personal page, went down in flames. Some of that was my own fault – too many users with access to the pages and that created exploitable holes. Some of that was backup programs saving the code creating problems with the server my pages are hosted. Live and learn.

So I’m back to recreating the site as it once was, and that’s going to take a lot of time. On top of the other things floating around in my head that I have plans creating.

Sometimes I do worry about this.

image

You hear that, CIA, FBI and NSA? You can even read the piece I wrote about ricin on my web site.

So… yeah… I’ve been in the depths of research before, following the chain of information. Going from a lame encyclopedia entry to the most horrifying of images and personal circle-jerks on forum pages, when I poke my brain out of the rabbit hole and this thought flashes.

Sheez… what some security guy in a darkened room might think when they follow my IP addresses.

Fun and photos from the first two dates of the book tour

Most of the first editions of my book A Thousand Points of Darkness sold out on First Friday. Many thanks to those who bought a copy to support the book and independent publishing.

Photo by Magdalena Barton

Photo by Magdalena Barton

Photo by Bakersfield Street Photography

Photo by Bakersfield Street Photography

George the Giant with his copy Photo by Belinda Rickett

George the Giant with his copy
Photo by Belinda Rickett

Signing another sold copy Photo by Belinda Rickett

Signing another sold copy
Photo by Belinda Rickett

Signing another copy for Professor Davies Photo by Belinda Rickett

Signing another copy for Professor Davies
Photo by Belinda Rickett

It's an honor standing next to Dolores Huerta. Such an amazing woman. Photo by Belinda Rickett

It’s an honor standing next to Dolores Huerta. Such an amazing woman.
Photo by Belinda Rickett

At the Elder and Oak. Photo by Belinda Rickett

At the Elder and Oak.
Photo by Belinda Rickett

Preorder Form for A Thousand Points of Darkness

Here’s an online form for A Thousand Points of Darkness if you would like a signed copy from the author.

Click here for the PDF: PreorderSheetAThousandPoints

Please download and fill it out. If the technology spirits smile upon us all, you should be able to do this within your browser. Click the SAVE FORM at the bottom.

I hate doing this, but I’m sure your human intellect can beat a SpamBot.

Send your saved PDF to:

jay [“A,” with a long, curly tail] jason [DamnSpamBots] rickett [dot] com.

Yes, I am a fountain pen nerd

I have loved fountain pens since I got my first calligraphy pen back in fifth grade. It was one of the Shaeffer calligraphy pens that can be found in most art supply stores. I’ve always played with calligraphy pens, and somewhere out there in the wide world, there’s a high school literary magazine cover filled with my calligraphy.

I expanded my fountain pen collection quite a bit over the last five years.

Just recently, I discovered statistic from the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery web site. It states over six billion disposable pens end in landfills every year. That’s 6 billion with a B. It’s hard to wrap the brain around that much waste, all of it plastic, going into a hole in the ground.

Here’s the next thing to wrap the brain around. Fountain pens have zero waste.

I’ll throw down this suggestion.

LamySafari

Let’s take a Lamy Safari for example, the little beauty above. It’s made of plastic, except for the nib and the clip, and a sweet little German fountain pen. I have one myself, and I usually have it filled with Noodler’s Gray. It usually comes with cartridges filled with ink you plug into the pen, and you’re off and writing. One can argue the cartridges will land in the garbage once they’re used up, producing a waste stream. Keep that thought in mind, and we’ll move to another solution.

cartridge converter

The cartridge converter, shown above. Plug this into the pen where the cartridge should be, twist the red end so it works a screw that will draw ink into the tube. No waste.

quink

Get yourself a bottle of Quink, shown above, and you have a writing system that will last for months, perhaps even a year until the bottle of ink runs out. Recycle the bottle. The pen will last as long as you last. No waste.

Hug a tree and hippie for all the wonderful things you’re doing for the environment. No more chunks of plastic going into landfills.

But you bought a whole package of cartridges. No fear. Find yourself a hypodermic needle, put it in the ink and draw the plunger, put the needle in the cartridge and refill. Still no waste.

Fountain pen snobs the world over might scoff at the options I have listed here. Lamy writes dry… Quink is good only on certain papers… buying hypodermic needles gets you put on a watch list. The color black is racist. Blah de blah. Every opinion has a counter-opinion and an argument.

The main reason I’ve listed these is for the price of an excellent pen that will last you.

Let me show you why I’ve picked out the system listed above.

All told, you’re looking at $35 for a damned good writing system (plus or minus shipping and handling).

I’ll continue this topic another post. This is something I can literally write thousands of words and your eyes will glaze over.